Wednesday, 16 August 2017

Lerwick Shetland

During our last trip we did another place that is in our blood, and that we  wanted to visit for many years.
The fishermen of Noordwijk and Katwijk  and Scheveningen went every year herring fishing near Lerwick.
Our Grandfather went there as well as a seventeen year old boy.
He told us many a time about his big adventure.
He fell ill with typhoid and could not stay on the vessel he came on The SCH 352.
This happened on the 25th Of June 1898.


It was even in The Shetland Times.Almost 100 hundred years ago.
Shetland Times 25 juni 1898

Shetland Times - Saturday 27 August 1898


The Dutch vicar L van der Valk , who felt sorry for the lad ,took care of him and placed him in the hospital and later took care of him in his own house.
On the 27th of August he was allowed to return home.
The minister was there to take care of the 3000-4000 Dutch fishermen that visited Lerwick.He stated that there was hardley any drunken or misbehaving Dutchmen .

He went then with our grandfather back on the ss  St Rognvald .

SS St Rognvald
SS St Rognvald
The trip back to Holland could not done  by herringship, but had to be done by ferry and  overland.
So they went this wayfrom Lerwick to Aberdeen and from there  to London.
And there Grandpa told us this remarkable story.....
I had to go to the toilet and there was not one .
"so I had to do it in some bushes"
However I was spotted by a Bobby .
Who told me "that will cost you a pound".
I replied.... looking at what I produced.....You can take that pound .There is more then enough there...
Grandpa did not go to sea anymore but worked in the bulbfields instead.
The fishermen brought back not only the herring but also Staffordshire flatback dogs and peppermint.


Wednesday, 9 August 2017

St Johns Canada

Also during this holiday we visited St Johns Canada.
The place where George Heath Vlieland was buried.


Pall Mall Gazette - Thursday 14 November 1872
Thursday 14 November 1872 Pall Mall Gazette - Deaths: VLIELAND, Mr. G. H., late of H.M. Customs, at St. John's, New Brunswick, aged 40, Oct. 31.
October 6 — The remains of the late Bro. George H. Vlieland were buried with masonic ceremony by the lodge in the Episcopal church yard, near the head of (Jourtenay bay. Bro. Vlieland was initiated in St. John's Lodge, June 4, 1872. 

Monday, 7 August 2017

Halifax and the Atlantic


visiting the Halifax maritime museum the story of Thomas Dunn comes alive.
Here it is once more.


Thomas Dunn on the SS Atlantic - March/April 1873
Atlantic was the second ship built for the newly reborn White Star Line by Harland and Wolff in 1870. She was powered by a steam engine producing 600 horsepower driving a single propeller, along with four masts rigged for sail. It was one of the finest passenger vessels of its time. The notices in the paper confirmed that “a stewardess and a surgeon are on board each voyage”. (They carried three stewardesses). She was also one of the fastest vessels, taking from eight days to cross the Atlantic and with a quick turnaround; having docked at Liverpool only eight days earlier.
Eleven days later, still at sea, the captain decided to steam to Halifax Nova Scotia, the nearest port, perhaps as initially reported because the vessel's coal supply was running low (seemingly because it was poor quality and burning too quickly) - but as suggested later because a storm was brewing. The weather on that American coast had been dreadful for two weeks and other vessels had gained port only with difficulty. On this, its nineteenth voyage, Atlantic seemed to suffer a catalogue of problems and then errors.
For some days the hatches had been battened down, some of the water supplies had been washed away and many passengers were complaining about the standard (and lack of) food. More worryingly, it has been suggested that this was a ramshackle crew, many recruited (or, rather, ‘picked up’) before they left. Captain Williams, formerly a Commodore for the Guion line had joined the ‘new’ White Star almost from its inception two years earlier and on his second ‘Atlantic’ voyage, calls them ‘rougher’ than usual and notes that, since the abolition of apprenticeships, it is not usual to get more than ten competent seamen of the forty required. He, himself, was a relative invalid after an earlier accident at sea, walking haltingly with a cane. Then, near a most dangerous (and, to him, unknown) coastline he left his bridge and retired to sleep in his chartroom leaving others (also not familiar with the coast) on duty.
Those Officers were not experienced with the entry to Halifax Harbour, failed to take soundings, post a masthead lookout, reduce speed or wake the captain as they near the unfamiliar coast. It seems that they somehow did not spot (or note the significance of) the Sambro Lighthouse, the large landfall lighthouse which warns mariners of the rocky shoals to the west of the harbour entrance - with horrific consequences. Incidentally, Thomas with his experience of the Cunard line would (like Quartermaster Robert Thomas) no doubt have known the Halifax coast better than the officers but he was not really in a position to ‘assist’.
At 3:00 a.m. local time on 1 April 1873, the Atlantic struck an underwater rock called Marr's Head 50 metres from Meagher's Island, Nova Scotia. The contemporary newspapers reported that the ships' officers were mainly to blame for the accident. Quartermaster (Mate) Robert Thomas had stated at the inquiries, that he had warned 1st Mate Metcalf against keeping too close to land, but Metcalf ignored his warnings. Robert Thomas had then addressed 4th Officer Brown, and suggested that they should go up to keep lookout since, if not, they would not be able to see land in good time before they struck it. Brown answered that this was not necessary (and suggested, seemingly, that neither was senior enough to make that decision). Quartermaster Thomas was at the rudder when the lookout before the mast shouted "ice ahead". It was not ice in this case but the waves dashing on the rocks. The course was immediately changed and the engine reversed on full power, but almost instantly the ship ran on to the rock, “within a cables length of safe harbour”.
Only one boat was launched and that went down with the loss of all aboard it. Other lifeboats were impossible to launch because the ship had listed, or were washed away or smashed as the ship quickly filled with water and flipped on its side. The struggle to leave the ship and make it to (precarious) Golden Rule Rock claimed the lives of all women aboard, all married men and all the children, except one. Several crew members heroically swam through heavy surf and freezing water to land rescue lines and seek help. One of those, according to the reports was Thomas Dunn. The New York Times of Thursday April 3rd 1873 devotes its whole front page to the disaster and lists Thomas Dunn in its list of crew saved. His obituary many years later confirms that he “was saved by swimming ashore after spending many hours in the rigging of the vessel”. The newspapers of the time confirm that "Parts of the rig remained over the surface after the ship went under, and those who could, climbed up and clung to the rig...Some of those clinging to the rig had died from the cold, among them the ship's cashier." Other articles note
that “many passengers froze to death in the rigging including the purser...some of them benumbed by cold loosed their hold and vanished”.
The loss of life was horrendous — 565 passengers and crew was an early estimate; though this discounted the hundred plus who had purchased tickets at Liverpool or Ireland before the boat sailed and whose records would sink with them and the ship. Many died in their cabins aware of the disaster only as the ship sank. Many of those on deck were swept away to their death “with piteous cries” when the ship sank. The disaster was the world's worst merchant shipwreck known at that time, and was not surpassed until the loss of the RMS Titanic in 1912. Half the ships crew died. Thomas Dunn was one who swam to land. Not only that but Quartermaster Robert Thomas (who was defacto in charge of the rescue attempt) says in his narrative that he was “relieved by Thomas Dunn and others” at nine a.m. when they were trying to get some survivors from the rock to the shore. (The book published that year simply says “a steward and one other”. It was left to the newspapers to report his name. Other ‘crew’ such as the captain’s servant do not merit a ‘name check’ either) Bob Love’s recent book commentary notes that “there were 1070 actual souls, living and recovered bodies. There were many bodies never recovered and some found miles away with others beneath the hull and left inside because the divers got more money for the salvage”.
More than one newspaper notes that early reports of the loss of the steamer with ‘some deaths’ were almost dismissed as an ‘April Fool joke’. One can only speculate upon how the news of the disaster was greeted in Liverpool, particularly since a full list of the people saved and lost was not immediately available (and papers concentrated, anyway, on the passengers and officers) and imagine the joy when the good news finally came through. “When a telegram of safe arrival at New York might have been hourly expected”, as the news put it, the initial news came the following day to Liverpool in a Lloyds telegram that wrote of the vessel being stranded on Magher’s Island and that part of her cargo would be saved.
The telegraph system was nationwide, following the major railways, by 1852. (On September 1 1846 the South Eastern Railway opened every telegraph station on its lines from London to Dover, Folkestone, Ramsgate and Margate to public messages for the first time - and Liverpool was part of the network by July 1947). There were, however, many different companies using different systems and messages had to be hand transcribed and re-sent between systems. The Atlantic cable of 1858 failed at huge cost. Two undersea cables to Dublin failed in 1859. The replacements failed in four years. Though the main British company The Electric Telegraph Company anticipated reaching New York by telegraph overland by way of Siberia, Russian America, Canada and California (and even experimented with wireless telegraphy in 1863), construction of the Russian America line was abandoned in July 1867. A circuit dedicated to Atlantic traffic, between Valentia San Diego and London, via Wexford, was finally leased in late 1867 and it was only on December 21, 1867 that a twenty-two word test message was sent from the Polytechnic in London to the telegraph station at Heart's Content in Newfoundland and messages were short. (In 1864 an 11,000 word speech sent to the Times took 6 hours to be received and produced a 1 mile long tape).
The news in the telegrams got worse but the first that the White Star Line owners heard of the extent of the calamity was in the second edition of the Liverpool papers of that following day. Early, though otherwise extensively detailed, reports in the English press concentrated on the lack of any immediate rescue vessels, the extreme cold, that not a woman or child survived and that had the first officer and two quartermasters not been able, after some hours to swim to the rocks and set up a line to pull some of those on the rigging to safety the list of survivors would have been negligible. The newspapers of the third of April noted that “the list of those saved has not yet been reported”. By the fourth they had reported only the first class passengers and ships officers that had been saved and by the fifth the Lancaster Chronicle was reporting a list of all the crew – but with no notice who had survived.
As we know even many of those who had managed to make it as far as the rigging did not ultimately survive; including the second officer whose piteous cries for help could not convince any of the survivors to attempt to make it back to him. A small percentage, only the strongest (luckiest and resourceful), survived. His years of sailing before the mast would no doubt have helped Thomas. There was not, even, any way of communicating from the fisherman’s cottages where the survivors found themselves with Halifax so someone was despatched on horseback.
Many of those who were rescued then had to walk into the nearest town through more than a foot of snow – not easy for the soaked, freezing and traumatised survivors. A large trench was dug where the bodies “of the unclaimed” were put. Thomas had lost many friends and colleagues and would no doubt have heard the cries of distress and seen the destruction and death in his mind for many years. Indeed, it is dwelt upon in his obituary many years later. No doubt some of Annie’s friends were now widows.
Forty two members of the crew arrived back in Liverpool on the 21st April. They were the ones not needed for the Inquiry. All those interviewed in the press roundly condemned the Captain. Thomas arrived on a different vessel with many of those who gave evidence. The Report of the Investigation into the Cause of the Wreck of the Steamship Atlantic was published in the federal government’s Sessional Papers of 1874 (volume VII, no. 3, pages LVI-LVII and 340-343). The report was part of the annual report of the Department of Marine and Fisheries. It is, however, only a summary of the court’s findings. Witness statements are not included. Unfortunately, the original records of the inquiry no longer exist. All records from before 1892 were destroyed in a fire in one of the Canadian Parliamentary buildings in 1897. It is fortunate that a copy was sent to the UK Board of Trade (and ended up in the National Archives at Kew).
The Times of the nineteenth reports his comments on the disaster and his attempts to get the captain to leave his bed at 2.15am. The time shown may be a typographical error (as is the spelling of his surname). In any event the time would not have been ‘exact’ since the captains own timepiece is ten minutes slower than the engine room clock. He is not ‘the Captains Servant’ whom the Inquiry accepts tries to raise him at 2:40/45 with his drink (as requested) but is stopped by the fourth officer. This is a ‘servant boy’ who, like all the women and children (save a single twelve year old), dies in the disaster and does not even receive the courtesy of a ‘name check’ in the inquiry. Did he go back to ‘the Servant’s quarters and tell the chief bedroom Steward that he had been prevented from doing his duty? Reuters also reports that ‘they’ had tried to raise the captain ten minutes before the crash. The captain, in his evidence, says that he slept until the ship struck and wishes he had been woken at three as he requested. He, perhaps tellingly, says that even if someone had tried to wake him they had not succeeded.
Thomas was a ‘Petty Officer” (as described in the Newspapers). The crew, effectively servants, were supposed to know their place, just as ‘downstairs’ in a country house was a strict hierarchy under the Butler. In the nineteen seventies I heard more than one senior Civil Servant commenting that clerical staff “were not allowed opinions”. A hundred years earlier, I read the statement that a quartermaster was told that he was neither the Captain nor first Officer, that he suggested that they were going so fast that, even were they to post a lookout (also suggested) they may be too late to stop the vessel hitting land. This was simply reported in the inquiry (not commented upon) and did not particularly concern the press or perturb or scandalise anyone. It was a fact of life; as was ‘ignoring’ all the crew (and second class passengers) in the early reports of survivors. Years later in the Titanic nearly all the first and second class women passengers survived. The third class generally died.
Although the officers ‘stuck together’ no fewer than two of the officers also contradict part of the Captains testimony. A captain who confirms that he was in the chartroom on the saloon deck thirty foot from the bridge asleep when the ship struck can, perhaps, not complain when his officers and quartermasters disagree who was where when the ship struck and who was ‘responsible’ for aiding the rescue attempts and who simply tried to save their own lives. Passenger’s statements in newspapers corroborate Quartermaster Robert Thomas’s version but they were not called...
The Inquiry only calls twenty one witnesses - a very limited mix of officers, a few first class passengers and lookouts. On the afternoon of the fifth of April after the first two passengers give evidence the committee suggests that they only need to hear from anyone who has something extra to add. The newspapers syndicated articles make clear that the Petty Officers (Thomas Dunn Chief Bedroom Steward, Samuel May Second Steward - the chief steward perished - and Ralph Smith Chief Saloon Steward) were not called. They and such ‘lowly’ people quoted as well as the witnesses in the many newspaper articles seemingly therefore were only able to tell the papers of their concerns.
The vessel on which Thomas returned to Liverpool docked at Queenstown on the eighteenth and delivered a number of despatches. Perhaps the paper spoke to him then. Either that or (far more unlikely) there is a gap in the list. The Inquiry was far more concerned with how the
accident happened to any thought of what happened after the ship hit the rocks. The subsequent Board of Trade inquiry concentrates on the ship and its cargo. Neither really asked all the questions or got to the bottom of the disaster. A book ‘rushed’ out in 1873 (named after Carrie Clancy the fisherman’s daughter who assisted in the rescue from the shore) notes that the “Lawyers seem more anxious to display their skill at pettifogging than to elicit truths”.
The Canadian inquiry still decides that the Captain’s conduct in the hours leading up to the disaster deserves censure but, in view of the Captain’s later heroism, they only suspended his licence for two years (and the fourth officer who was on duty was suspended for three months). The inquiry had reported before Thomas made his comments. Nearly forty years later in the subsequent White Star line disaster, the Titanic, (which killed a smaller percentage of its passengers) their Captain was questioned by the Inquiry as to why the story of the Atlantic had not acted as a salutary reminder and why its lessons had not prevented the loss of his vessel...
The 10th May 1873 Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald articles said “Mr. Thomas Dunn, grandson of Mr. Thomas Dunn, of this town,and chief bedroom steward on board the Atlantic, is one of the survivors from this ill-fated vessel. His statement of the catastrophe, published the New York papers, is one of great interest” – still in family contact!
Thomas did not leave the sea immediately, indeed, the birth of his next child a year after the disaster shows him as a ‘ships steward’ in 1874 (and suggests that he may have had a bit of time at home after it to recuperate - as all the others seem to have been conceived at the time at the turn of the year when the port was less busy). It seems that he had been home during three Decembers, but seemingly not for an early christening of his third child. Some of the forgoing chapter is necessarily based upon newspaper reports of Thomas’s words – taken at face value – but there is one piece of conjecture. It is possible that Annie had been ‘expecting’ at the time of his shipwreck and that the shock had an effect. Thomas’s first three children are all born a couple of years apart and there is nothing to suppose that she was pregnant. In any event, this is not something upon which I would wish to speculate further.
At the birth of his first and third children Thomas is described as a seaman in the Merchant Service but at the second and fourth as a Ships steward. (This job description is found both for the birth and baptism certificates). As a petty officer (senior bedroom steward), it is likely that he had been a steward for some time and would simply be using his title of ‘seaman’ as a generic or historic description; viz that he no longer had any need to undertake those duties. One presumes however that, if a senior steward’s job was not available Thomas would have required work as a steward/seaman. In any event, he would hardly have been home when he was working. It is always possible that Thomas’s comments in the paper would have made him less able to find work and many modern commentators suggest that all those who gave evidence would have been suffering from post traumatic stress disorder. Quartermaster Thomas tells the papers weeks later that he “had slept but little, he no sooner fell asleep than he awoke with the despairing cry of that dreadful morning sounding in hls ears”. Another of the Petty Officers said that he was “about to sail in another of the White Star Liners on Thursday next, as I know by experience there are no finer boats afloat”. A later obituary of Thomas says that “through being many hours in the rigging, and then having swum ashore, he suffered intensely from the cold: and it is supposed that the neuralgia from which he suffered for some years was thus caused”
In mid 1875, however, Thomas and Annie and family leave Liverpool for Margate. Mother Annie is returning to where she was born and Thomas to his grandfather’s abode. Perhaps now he wanted to spend more time with his family or perhaps the thought of how near he was to being lost at sea tipped the balance. Perhaps it was as well. When they leave Liverpool (and Thomas leaves the sea) his brother in law Walter Perkins is Master of a vessel there. He is still its master some ten years later when it is lost at sea. Lord Winston quotes studies on epigenetics showing that, after wars and disasters, the general population begins to produce more male children. Though we cannot draw any ‘scientific’ conclusions from Thomas’s life after his ‘disaster’, following his move to Margate he would have seven more children. The only further girl born was a twin. He has five more sons and a brand new career...
Saturday 14 January 1899 Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - The late Mr. T. Dunn.—We regret to announce the death of Mr. Thos. Dunn, of Parade House, which took place in London on Wednesday, after a painful illness of some months' duration. He was for years the collector of Queen's taxes for this district ... and also for sixteen years local agent to the General Steam Navigation Company. Paralysis was the cause of death. The deceased in early life followed the sea, and was wrecked in the White Star line steamer Atlantic, off Halifax, Nova Scotia, on the Ist April. 1872 (sic), and, through being many hours in the rigging, and then having swum ashore, he suffered intensely from the cold: and it is supposed that the neuralgia from which he suffered for some years was thus caused.

More on Thomas and the S.S.Atlantic

Tuesday, 11 July 2017

Henry John Vlieland or Wieland






Henry John Wieland
Death 16 May 1903  Ayr, Waterloo, Ontario
Male
0
Conestago
1903
Henry John Wieland
Ontario Deaths and Overseas Deaths, 1939-1947

Name Henry John Wieland
Event Type Death
Event Date 16 May 1903
Event Place Ayr, Waterloo, Ontario
Gender Male
Age 0
Birthplace Conestago
Birth Year (Estimated) 1903

Nicholas Vlieland


The London Stage 1930-1939: A Calendar of Productions, Performers, and Personnel

Door J. P. Wearing.















s.s.edinburgh castle

The East and South Africa mail liner S/S Edinburgh Castle was requisitioned during WW1, armed and used as a an armed cruiser in the South Atlantic Squadron.

Ready for the breakers in 1939, she was requisitioned again in WWII, in which she served as an accomodation ship for survivors of sunken ships at Freetown, Sierra Leone.

In November 1945, being declared not worth to tow back to England, Edinburgh Castle was sunk as an exercise target by gunfire from the armed trawler Cape Warwick, HMS Porchester Castle and HMS Launceston Castle, some 60 miles off Freetown.

Rather an infamous end for such a beautiful liner.


Monday, 10 July 2017

HMS Eland

H.M.S.Eland 

Shove,
Herbert William
J.A. Shuter 
Son of Herbert Samuel and Bertha Shove.
Married 1st (1910) Guinevere Wren (died 1920), daughter of J.A.E. Wren; four daughters.
Married 2nd (1920) Mary Myrtle Reilly, daughter of Col. J.A.H. Reilly; three sons.
Residence: Ditchling Common, Sussex.

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06.07.1886
Faversham, Kent
 
-
05.12.1943RN Hospital Durdham Down, Bristol
(died of illness) [age 57]
[Bristol (Arnos Vale) Cemetery, TTT.959]
A/S.Lt.15.07.1905
S.Lt.17.01.1907, seniority 15.07.1905
Lt.10.07.1907, seniority 15.01.1906
Lt.Cdr.15.01.1914 (retd 07.11.1919)
Cdr. (retd)06.07.1926
A/Capt. (retd) 
25.07.1942?
Distinguished Service OrderDSO02.11.1917in recognition of services in submarines in enemy waters
Officer of the Order of the British Empire (Military Division)OBE11.07.1940in recognition of distinguished services during the war [investiture 03.09.40]
Mention in DespatchesMIDWW I?
Lived as a child with his farming family on Queen Court Farm, in Ospringe.
15.01.1902entered RN
?-(10.1913)HMS C 2 (submarine) [tender to HMS Thames (depot ship)]
1915-1916Commanding Officer, HMS C 2 (submarine)
1916?-1918?Commanding Officer, HMS E 29 (submarine)
1918?-1919?Commanding Officer, HMS K 3 (submarine)
Distributist, journalist, and Catholic Land Association Secretary, living at Hallett's Farm, Ditchling.
25.08.1939-(04.1940)HMS Pembroke IV (accounting base, Chatham) (for organizing the defenses of the Port of London)
03.01.1941-(02.)1941HMS Flora (RN base, Invergordon) (for miscellaneous services)
14.06.1941-(12.1941)HMS Helicon (RN base, Aultbea)
25.07.1942-09.09.1942Commanding Officer, HMS Edinburgh Castle (RN base, Freetown, Sierra Leone)
10.09.1942-05.12.1943HMS Eland (RN base, Freetown, Sierra Leone)
Published: The fairy ring of commerce (1930); An outline of personalism.

Sunday, 9 July 2017

Mary Myrtle Reilly

Birth: Jul. 19, 1887, England
Death: Mar. 29, 1971, England.

Sources:
England & Scotland, Select Cemetery Registers, 1800-2014
England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837-1915
England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007

Family links:
 Spouse:
  Herbert William Shove (1886 - 1943)

their children :
Burial:
Littlehampton Cemetery
Littlehampton
Arun District
West Sussex, England

Saturday, 8 July 2017

Lillian Phoebe Millen

Lillian Phoebe Millen daughter of Sydney William Millen and Ethel Mary Lilley.
was born in 1911 in Faversham.
Lilian died in 2007, aged 96
She had at least two more sisters (Nettie Mary b. 1909, d. 1997) and Betty Madge (b. 1914, d. 1974)

Friday, 7 July 2017

Guinevere Mary Austin Wren

Name: Herbert William Shove
Birth Date: 1887
Age: 23
Spouse's Name: Guinevere Mary Austin Wren
Spouse's Birth Date: 1892
Spouse's Age: 18
Event Date: 29 Mar 1910
Event Place: St. Mary The Crowned, Gibraltar
Father's Name: Herbert Shove
Mother's Name: Bertha Millen
Spouse's Father's Name: Joseph Wren
Spouse's Mother's Name: Windfred Bligh
Race: White
Spouse's Race: White
Crowned, Gibraltar, reference ; FHL microfilm 1,738,755.

Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Herbert William Shove

Herbert William Shove  the son of Herbert Samuel Shove and Bertha Millen.

Birth: Jul. 6, 1886 Faversham Swale Borough Kent, England
Death: Dec. 5, 1943 Bristol
Bristol Unitary Authority Bristol, England.

Parents:
Herbert Samuel Shove (1854-1889)and
Bertha Millen (1865-1940) both Ospringe, Kent, England


2 Brothers:
Gerald Frank Shove (Nov 1887 – Aug 1947) was a noted Cambridge economist, author and conscientious objector.
Ralph Samuel Shove (May 1889 – Feb 1966) was a County Court judge and a rower who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics to win a silver medal with his team.

Spouses:
Guinevere Mary Wren (1891-1920) 4 daughters
Myrtle Mary Reilly (1887-1971) 3 sons

Herbert was an associate of the Ditchling community (Eric Gill, Hilary Pepler, David Jones and others who formed the Guild of St. Joseph and St. Dominic) and a follower of Hilaire Belloc, G. K. Chesterton and other distributists.

An influence on the Catholic Land Movement, he advocated a middle way between socialism and liberalism in a 'return to the land'. This conservative agrarianism eventually led him towards a flirtation with the reactionary right in the mid-1930s. His life and writings, however, provide an opportunity for reflection on the 'inconvenient history' of interwar ruralist/ecological movements in the 1930s within their entangled contexts of cultural despair and extremes of Englishness.

Books: The Fairy Ring of Commerce, Flee to the Fields: The Faith and Works of the Catholic Land Movement, The Catholic Land Movement: It's Motives and It's Aims and Methods, Distributist Perspectives: Volume I,
Distributist Perspectives: Volume II: Essays on the Economics of Justice and Charity

Decorated for action in the Royal Navy submarine service in the Great War, he was re-mobilised in World War II and died of privations suffered in West Africa.
1917 awarded the D.S.O. for successfully getting his submarine through the Dardanelles during WW1.
1940 awarded the O.B.E. for his work routing shipping convoys during WW2.

lived as a child with his farming family on Queen Court Farm, in Ospringe.
15.01.1902
entered RN
(10.1913)
HMS C 2 (submarine) [tender to HMS Thames (depot ship)]
1915
-1916
Commanding Officer, HMS C 2 (submarine)
1916?
-1918?
Commanding Officer, HMS E 29 (submarine)
1918?
-1919?
Commanding Officer, HMS K 3 (submarine)
Distributist, journalist, and Catholic Land Association Secretary, living at Hallett's Farm, Ditchling.
25.08.1939
-(04.1940)
HMS Pembroke IV (accounting base, Chatham) (for organizing the defenses of the Port of London)
03.01.1941
-(02.)1941
HMS Flora (RN base, Invergordon) (for miscellaneous services)
14.06.1941
-(12.1941)
HMS Helicon (RN base, Aultbea)
25.07.1942
-09.09.1942
Commanding Officer, HMS Edinburgh Castle (RN base, Freetown, Sierra Leone)
10.09.1942
-05.12.1943
HMS Eland (RN base, Freetown, Sierra Leone)


More:
http://www.roll-of-honour.org/Sussex/Ditchling.html
http://www.unithistories.com/officers/RN_officersS1b.html


Incidentally, Chief Willie, Herbert Shove is one of the war dead interred in Arnos Vale. The information I have is that he died on 5 December 1943 (not 1950 as the standard internet bio has it). He became ill while serving at HMS Eland (shore establishment, Freetown, Sierra Leone) and returned to the UK on the SS Edinburgh Castle, dying either on the ship or shortly after returning. As well as his DSO (1917) he was awarded the OBE in 1940. I have further information (non-service related) about him and his brothers, so if interested, please PM me for further discussion.

As well as the Arnos Vale headstone, he is commemorated on the Roll of Honour in Ditchling Church, see:
http://www.roll-of-honour.org/Sussex/Ditchling.html



Family links:
Parents:
Herbert Samuel Shove (1854 - 1889)
Bertha Millen Shove (1865 - 1940)

Spouse:
Mary Myrtle Reilly Shove (1887 - 1971)*
Birth: Jul. 19, 1887, England
Death: Mar. 29, 1971,England.

Sources:
England & Scotland, Select Cemetery Registers, 1800-2014
England & Wales, Civil Registration Birth Index, 1837-1915
England & Wales, Civil Registration Death Index, 1916-2007
Family links:
Spouse:
Herbert William Shove (1886 - 1943)


Burial:
Littlehampton Cemetery
Littlehampton
Arun District
West Sussex, England
Plot: C 126Siblings:
Herbert William Shove (1886 - 1943)
Gerald Frank Shove (1887 - 1947)*
Ralph Samuel Shove (1889 - 1966)*


Son of Herbert Samuel and Bertha Shove.
Married 1st (1910) Guinevere Wren (died 1920), daughter of J.A.E. Wren; four daughters.
Married 2nd (1920) Mary Myrtle Reilly, daughter of Col. J.A.H. Reilly; three sons.
Residence: Ditchling Common, Sussex.
lived as a child with his farming family on Queen Court Farm, in Ospringe.
15.01.1902 entered RN

(10.1913)
HMS C 2 (submarine) [tender to HMS Thames (depot ship)]
1915

1916
Commanding Officer, HMS C 2 (submarine)

1916?
-
1918?
Commanding Officer, HMS E 29 (submarine)

1918?
-
1919?
Commanding Officer, HMS K 3 (submarine)



Distributist, journalist, and Catholic Land Association Secretary, living at Hallett's Farm, Ditchling.

25.08.1939
-
(04.1940)
HMS Pembroke IV (accounting base, Chatham) (for organizing the defenses of the Port of London)

03.01.1941
-
(02.)1941
HMS Flora (RN base, Invergordon) (for miscellaneous services)

14.06.1941
-
(12.1941)
HMS Helicon (RN base, Aultbea)

25.07.1942
-
09.09.1942
Commanding Officer, HMS Edinburgh Castle (RN base, Freetown, Sierra Leone)

10.09.1942
-
05.12.1943
HMS Eland (RN base, Freetown, Sierra Leone)


more on Herbert William Shove

Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser - Saturday 19 December 1908
naval court-martial at Portsmouth, yesterday, acquitted Lieutenant Herbert William Shove, of the submarine depot ship " Mercury,' 0 f a charge drunkenness ashore, in respect which the Portsmouth magistrates had fined him. Police- Surgeon Maybury stated that h e would have trusted himself with the accused in the submarine. Leave expunge certain entries at the Stationers' Hall in reference to the copyright share certificate books, issued by an Oldham firm, was granted by a Divisional Court, yesterday, it being held that they were copied by the respondent from a proof handed him for the purpose of printing from it for the Lees Brook Spinning Company. When a foreman plate-layer was walking down the Oldham, Ashton and Guide Bridge Junction Railway line towards Ashton, yesterday morning, he found a man unconscious, his head being a foot away from the metals. He had apparently been knocked down by a passing train, and was removed to the local infirmary, where he wa3 later identified as John Buckley, of Viscountstreet, Rochdale.

Tuesday, 4 July 2017

Gerald Frank Shove

Shove was born at Faversham, Kent,the son of Herbert Samuel Shove and Bertha Millen.
 He was educated at Uppingham School and King's College, Cambridge, where he became a member of the Cambridge Apostles.

He married in 1915 Fredegond Maitland, daughter of historian Frederic William Maitland and his wife the playwright Florence Henrietta Fisher. In World War I he was a conscientious objector, like many others in the Bloomsbury Group, of which he was a member; he worked as a poultry keeper at Garsington, the home of Lady Ottoline Morrell.
His academic career was spent at King's College, Cambridge, becoming lecturer in 1923, Fellow in 1926, and Reader in 1945.

His younger brother was the Olympic rower Ralph Shove.

He died at Old Hunstanton and was buried at the Parish of the Ascension Burial Ground in Cambridge; his wife Fredegond was also interred in the same burial plot.

Monday, 3 July 2017

Ralph Shove

Ralph Shove was the son of William Samuel Shove and Bertha Millen.


Ralph Samuel Shove (31 May 1889 – 2 February 1966) was a British County Court judge and a rower who competed in the 1920 Summer Olympics.

Shove was born at Faversham, Kent, the son of Herbert Samuel Shove and his wife Bertha Millen.He was educated at Uppingham School, where he was a first team rugby player, and at Trinity College, Cambridge. At Cambridge he rowed in the Cambridge boat in the Boat races in 1912 and 1913.

Shove was called to the bar at Inner Temple. During World War I he served in the Royal Field Artillery, and went to France in November 1914. He was a captain, and was once wounded.

Shove was captain of the Leander eight which won the silver medal for Great Britain rowing at the 1920 Summer Olympics, coming within half a length of winning.
Shove was appointed as a County Court Judge and J. P. in 1945, and became Vice-Chairman of the Lindsey Quarter Sessions. He was chairman of the Kesteven and Holland Quarter Sessions from 1946.

Shove lived at The Old Hall, Washingboro, Lincoln, and died at North Kesteven, Lincolnshire at the age of 76. His elder brother was the Cambridge economist Gerald Shove.

Shove married Evelyn Forster at South Kensington on 31 July 1928




Major Ralph Samuel Shove, RFA
Born in May 1889, the son of Mr and Mrs. Herbert Samuel Shove of Ospringe, Faversham, Kent
Educated at Uppingham School from September 1903 to July 1908 (school praetor; played on XV in 1906 and 1907) and at Trinity College, Cambridge (2nd Class Tripos, 1911, University VIII in 1912 and 1913)
Before the war he was a barrister at the Inner Temple
Served as a Captain, RFA; once wounded
Went to France as an RFA Reinforcement on 7 November 1914
Captain, No. 3 RFA Officers' Cadet School at Weedon
Class B Mention in War Office List dated 13 August 1918
In 1928 he married Evelyn, daughter of Rev. Charles Forster of Holne Chase, Ashburton, Devon
Captain of the Leander Crew at the Olympic Games in Belgium
Appointed as a County Court Judge in 1945 and J. P. the same year
Chairman of the Kesteven and Holland Quarter Sessions from 1946
Vice-Chairman of the Lindsey Quarter Sessions from 1945
His address in 1947 was: The Old Hall, Washingboro, Lincoln
Died in February 1966

Sources: Uppingham School Roll, 1824-1931; Uppingham School Roll, 1853-1947; Uppingham School Roll, 1900-1972; Inner Templars in the Great War; The War List of the University of Cambridge 1914-1918; Kelly's Handbook to the Titled, Landed and Official Classes.


The service papers for a 'Capt. R. Shove' are available at the National Archives under WO339/26442 which most likely are his service papers.



Regards, Dick Flory

post-49647-1253098145.jpg

Sunday, 2 July 2017

Herbert Samuel Shove

Birth: May 25, 1854, England
Death: Jun. 28, 1889
Ospringe
Swale Borough
Kent, England

Herbert Samuel Shove (1854-1889)and
Bertha Millen (1865-1940) both Ospringe, Kent, England

Herbert Samuel Shove, of Queen Court, Ospringe,



born 25 May 1854, died 28 June 1889, was elected to the Porter Club on 29 November 1881. He was also a founder subscriber to the Faversham Club in 1884.

In 1885, aged 31, he married Bertha Millen, aged 20, at Ospringe Church.

Details from Faversham Society records at the Fleur de Lis Heritage Centre.


Family links:
Spouse:
Bertha Millen Shove (1865 - 1940)

Children:
Herbert William Shove (1886 - 1943)*
Gerald Frank Shove (1887 - 1947)*
Ralph Samuel Shove (1889 - 1966)*

Burial:
St Peter and St Paul Churchyard
Ospringe
Swale Borough
Kent, England
Herbert Samuel Shove


Baptism 23 Jun 1854 • St Alphege, Greenwich, Kent, England,
Father: Samuel Shove,
Mother: Sarah, address Dacre park, Lee (date of birth in baptismal register)
Death 28 Jun 1889 • Margate Kent England from inflammation following operation for abscess on lungs

"agriculturist, with the brightest prospects before him. less than four years ago he married the eldest daughter of Mr. W. Millen, of Syndale Farm, who is left with three children, the youngest of whom is but a month old. " - Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 06 July 1889

Burial 02 Jul 1889 • St Peter and St Paul Churchyard, Ospringe Kent England was attended by all the employees of the deceased's three farms: Queen Court Luddenham Court and Plumford - Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 06 July 18




Saturday, 1 July 2017

Bertha Shove maiden name Millen





She was born in Faversham Sept 1865 as a daughter of William Millen and 
she married Herbert Samuel Shove.
And their children are
Captain Herbert William Shove.
Gerald Frank Shove
Ralph Samuel Shove


According to information on the internet the Queens farm  . Herbert William Shove, who I believe was probably born at Queen Court, Ospringe, in July 1886. His father, Herbert Samuel Shove, certainly owned or rented the property at the time of his marriage the previous year. His mother was Bertha, née Millen, whose family lived at Syndale in Ospringe, according to the marriage lines.
I see the webpage for Queen Court shows an image of the building c1890 with a women and two boys posing in front of the house. Might this be Bertha, Herbert (junior) and the second son, Gerald? If so, the 1890 date for the image looks a little early. Herbert (senior) died in 1889 and is buried in Ospringe churchyard (although he is listed as SHORE on the church webpages

In the birthdaybook some of the Shoves are listed
Herbert S. Shove 25 May, (no year). Bertha Millen Shove July 14th 1865
Birth: 1865, EnglandDeath: 1940, England

Herbert Samuel Shove (1854-1889)and
Bertha Millen (1865-1940) both Ospringe, Kent, England
Family links:
Spouse:
Herbert Samuel Shove (1854 - 1889)*

Children:
Herbert William Shove (1886 - 1943)*
Gerald Frank Shove (1887 - 1947)*
Ralph Samuel Shove (1889 - 1966)*



Burial:
St Peter and St Paul Churchyard
Ospringe
Swale Borough
Kent, England





Birth 14 Jul 1865 • Stalisfield, Kent, England - date in 1939 register
MILLEN, BERTHA, Mother's Maiden Surname: COULSON, GRO Reference: 1865 S Quarter in FAVERSHAM Volume 02A Page 648
Baptism 13 Aug 1865 • Stalisfield, Kent, England
Residence 1881 • Dover St Mary Virgin, Kent, England - Pupil
Marriage 07 Oct 1885 • Ospringe, Kent, England - Herbert Samuel Shove (25 May 1854– 28 Jun 1889)
"7th inst., at the church of SS. Peter and Paul, Ospringe, Rent, by the Rev. S. G. Read, M.A., Rector of Barton Bendish, Norfolk " - 10 Oct 1885 - The Ipswich Journal
Residence 1891 • Ospringe, Kent, England, Head of House: widow with children Herbert, Gerald and Ralph
Residence 02 Apr 1911 • Paddington, London, England, Widowed; Visitor - Independent means
Probate 1934 - probate of last surviving brother Frank's will
Address Sep 1939 • “Belle Vue”, Henley R.D., Oxfordshire, England, Private Means Widowed, with Monica B Shove (b1915) and one other in 1939 Register
Death 31 Oct 1940 • Goring on Thames, Oxfordshire, England


Burial St Peter and St Paul Churchyard, Ospringe, Kent, England

Friday, 30 June 2017

John Nicolls Vlieland

John Nicholls
Last name Vlieland
Gender Male
Birth year
Birth place
Baptism year 1826
Baptism date 15 Jan 1826
Place Southwold
County Suffolk
Country England
Father's first name(s) John
Father's last name Vlieland
Mother's first name(s) Mary
Mother's last name
Record set England Births & Baptisms 1538-1975
Category Birth, Marriage, Death & Parish Records
Subcategory Births & baptisms
Collections from England, Great Britain

Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Eleanor Hill

Eleanor Hill 
Name: Eleanor Hill
Gender: Female
Christening Date: 01 Jul 1812
Christening Place: Yarmouth, Norfolk, England
Birth Date: 30 Jun 1812
Father's Name: Mark Hill
Mother's Name: Sarah Tower



wedding of Mark and Sarah Tower her parents





Eleanor Hill and John Vlieland the banns forbidden has a wife living at Southwold .
Name: John Vlieland
Birth Date:
Birthplace:
Age:
Spouse's Name: Eleanor Hill
Spouse's Birth Date:
Spouse's Birthplace:
Spouse's Age:
Event Date: 22 Dec 1833
Event Place: Yarmouth, Norfolk, England


We think John Vlieland is still married to Mary Grimmer at that time..



Another John Vlieland is married in 1838 to Jane Martin .


This Jane remarries as John dies .

But in the census of 1841 we find John Vlieland mariner 45 years old  living with his sisters